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Making a Mighty Mini-Mi: The Joy of Mentoring

If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants. —Isaac Newton Last time we explored the wonders of the prefrontal cortex, the thing that makes us...well, us. This time we shall talk of mentoring, the art and science of sharing with others all that...

Know Your Brain: The Prefrontal Cortex

Last time we discussed the value of practice, and how dangerous practice is if not paired with feedback. Today, I would like to introduce you to the first in a series of articles titled “Know Your Brain.” Each article will discuss a brain area, neurochemical, or other valuable brain concept.

The Definition of Insanity: Why Practice Alone is a Recipe for Disaster

When it comes to building our skills, feedback is not the first tool most people consider. In my workshops, whenever I ask what it takes to get better at something, the first thing I hear is, “Practice!”

Change a Little, Gain a Lot: The Transformative Power of Feedback

Last week we talked about attacking problems rather than people. This week we return to one of our favorite topics: the gift of feedback. This post is adapted from the introduction to our book “Where’s the Gift? Using Feedback to Work Smarter, Learn Faster and Avoid Disaster.”

You Don’t Know Me! Attacking Problems, Not People

Are you happier this week than you were last week? If you read our previous post, I hope the answer is yes! Today is about how to influence others by striking at problems rather than people.

This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things! The Neuroscience of Happiness

This week’s article is adapted from our book Why the Rhino Scatters his S#!T: Expanding Your Fun, Fulfillment, and Impact at Work.

The Curse of Criticism: Why Feedback Hurts, Even When We Want It

Last week, we set the stage for the New Year with a discussion about goal setting and how to make goals actually work. This week, we will address a topic near and dear to my heart: the neuroscience behind why feedback conversations are so difficult.

Setting Goals that Work: How to Beat the Lazy Brain

Given our love of setting New Year’s goals that are then thrown away faster than an ugly Christmas sweater, today, we will talk about settings goals that work.

It’s How We’ve Always Done It: Why We Love What We’ve Already Got

Last week, we talked about the genius of that “damned fool” Abraham Lincoln. This week addresses one of the greatest philosophical questions of our modern age: Coke or Pepsi. (The following is adapted from our book Why the Rhino Scatters his S#!T: Expanding Your Fun, Fulfillment, and Impact at Work.)

The Damned Fool: Abraham Lincoln and the Art of Receiving Feedback

Last week, your humble author discussed what a cheap anti-tipping foreign weirdo he is, and the value of meeting others’ unspoken needs—at work and at home. Today is about, and I quote, the “damned fool” Abraham Lincoln.

Our PREVIOUS ARTICLES

 

Making a Mighty Mini-Mi: The Joy of Mentoring

If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants. —Isaac Newton Last time we explored the wonders of the prefrontal cortex, the thing that makes us...well, us. This time we shall talk of mentoring, the art and science of sharing with others all that...

Know Your Brain: The Prefrontal Cortex

Last time we discussed the value of practice, and how dangerous practice is if not paired with feedback. Today, I would like to introduce you to the first in a series of articles titled “Know Your Brain.” Each article will discuss a brain area, neurochemical, or other valuable brain concept.

Change a Little, Gain a Lot: The Transformative Power of Feedback

Last week we talked about attacking problems rather than people. This week we return to one of our favorite topics: the gift of feedback. This post is adapted from the introduction to our book “Where’s the Gift? Using Feedback to Work Smarter, Learn Faster and Avoid Disaster.”

The Curse of Criticism: Why Feedback Hurts, Even When We Want It

Last week, we set the stage for the New Year with a discussion about goal setting and how to make goals actually work. This week, we will address a topic near and dear to my heart: the neuroscience behind why feedback conversations are so difficult.

It’s How We’ve Always Done It: Why We Love What We’ve Already Got

Last week, we talked about the genius of that “damned fool” Abraham Lincoln. This week addresses one of the greatest philosophical questions of our modern age: Coke or Pepsi. (The following is adapted from our book Why the Rhino Scatters his S#!T: Expanding Your Fun, Fulfillment, and Impact at Work.)

You Don’t Know Me! The Art of Meeting Unspoken Needs

Last week, we celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday by diving into the neuroscience of gratitude. Today, we will talk about how we can make our customers (at work or at home) more grateful to have us in their lives.

Rewiring the Brain for Success: The Neuroscience of Gratitude

Last week we discussed the British defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana and the importance of receiving feedback from anyone, regardless of their "rank". Last week we also celebrated Thanksgiving in the United States, so it seems like an especially appropriate time to...

You Can’t Handle the Truth! How our Brains Hide from Facts

Last time we addressed several strategies for breaking free of our career plateaus and taking our jobs to the next level. Today we get a little more...personal. I am the proud parent of one incredible child. I have also lived the majority of my life in Utah, a land...

Getting Away with Murder: Why Networking Matters

During the planet’s uneasy peace between its first and second World Wars, a student at Cambridge University in England was slaving away in a lab. He was a theoretical physicist, but the tutor assigned to him was Patrick Blackett, a great experimental physicist. This student hated his tutor, and he hated the boring, repetitive lab work he was forced to undertake. Finally, in a fit of frustration and despair, the student took an apple, filled it with poison from the lab, and placed it on his tutor’s desk.

The Best Restaurant Server I Ever Met: A Lesson in Career Development

Some years ago my team and I were asked to work with a local chain of restaurants to help boost server productivity. We took a look at which servers got the best tips, as well as those who drummed up the biggest sales. We saw a lot of what we expected to see. The best servers were warm and considerate. They were not rushed, and did a great job recommending sides and desserts that customers may have otherwise passed over.

Helping Your Brain Embrace Change

The late 20th century brought an information technology revolution the likes of which we hadn’t seen since the invention of the book. Within just two decades the internet became a global information network that carried the entire wealth of human knowledge. Shortly thereafter we got magical pocket computers with which to access this information at anytime from virtually anywhere. And the magical pocket computers even make phone calls! While such a revolution brought with it significant challenges, it is generally seen now as an overwhelming success.

This is Your Brain. This is Your Brain on Change

When I was six years old I faced the greatest change my young life had then been exposed to. I was invited to change myself—to do something I’d never done before. Suffice it to say, my six-year-old self was not pleased.